2×2 more bones of the cranium

Your skull, the most complex part of your skeletal system, includes 29 bones grouped into 2 sections – your neurocranium and your facial bones. The last 3 months I’ve spent most afternoons studying and drawing the 8 cranial bones that hold and protect your brain. I may have already said this – think brain helmet!

The word cranium derives from the Greek kranion (skull) and relates to kara (head). Also known as braincase (favorite) and brainpan (least favorite) among other names. This is my first time looking at the top of the skull and connecting the parts. I don’t know how engaging each of these 8 bones are until after I begin my study. The decision to draw them all out is organic – one visually appealing bone leads to another.

I’ve shared the 4 unpaired bones and now I study and complete the 2 paired bones that sit on either side of (and above and below) your skull/head.

Parietal bone, exterior surface.

The Parietal bones form the roof and sides of your skull and head. Their name comes from the Latin paries, meaning wall. If I understand correctly this bone articulates with the other parietal bone, with the temporal, sphenoid and occipital bones – all but the ethmoid bone!

Parietal bone, interior surface.

I enjoy painting the edges (the sutures) of all the various cranial bones. This elegant form  below is the temporal bone – the other paired bone. They sit on either side (your temples) and base of your skull.

Temporal bone, outer surface.

Temporal bone, internal surface.

The temporal bones are a wonderfully complex design serving clear purpose (How can this stuff be random?! Who designed it?!!). I won’t get into it too much even though I want to – I’m an artist not a scientist. Lol. These bones house the structures of your ears (They house the structures of your ears!!!!).  I could probably break down the parts of this bone and even be willing to draw each of them separately because interesting shape and interesting name (wow stuff) always calls my attention.

I am complete with the 8 bones of the cranium. Early on I completed the ethmoid bone – for me that wild and beautiful bone ushered all the other cranial bones into the studio.


And on a side note:
Last week was my artist reception at the BioMedical campus in downtown Phoenix.  I completely enjoy the evening.

Photo by Christy Vezolles.

During this time that I’ve had my work in a medical school – one question pops up regularly with the various events. People want to know where my interest in anatomy comes from. While I have alway participated in sports (still run, practice Yoga), I explain my appreciation for the body and anatomy came from my anatomy studies in art school. It’s odd to me that it is not common knowledge that artists study anatomy. I loved drawing and learning the names of all the major bones and muscles of the human body.

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