the front and the back bones holding your brilliance

They are elegant and living organs – the bones of your skull.  Each one of the cranial bones is unique in architecture. I appreciate the contour of the frontal bone, most especially the sutures (fibrous joints).

Cranial bones are the hard mineral matrix supporting (fixing) the structure of your face (Including your sensory structures). The cranial bones provide protection for the brain (aka: braincase). In the case of the frontal bone – it protects the frontal lobe of the brain.

Your frontal bone forms your beautiful forehead and shapes the top edge of your orbits – look at that brow ridge!

Front bone (anterior)

Front bone (posterior)

The Occipital bone ↓ forms your posterior skull, your cranial cavity. It has a large opening, the foramen magnum (Latin for great hole), where your spinal cord exits your skull.

All the while I draw – I consider the energetics of this area…where the spinal cord exits the skull…It must be a sacred space!

Occipital bone – external surface

Occipital bone, inner surface

Studying the 8 cranial bones for a good while, I am not yet done. I look at the 2-paired bones next.  I could not have known how intricate and wonderful the upper skull is (what to me so long!).

Today I know better these bones that protect our brain, and protect our brilliance!  Out on an early bike ride this a.m. – I appreciate my bicycle helmet just a little bit more…

pugmark

A pugmark refers to the mark, track or footprint of an animal on the ground.

Invited to exhibit my jaguar at the i.d.e.a. Museum in February, they ask if I have touchable and tactile art samples for visitors to interact with. I don’t. But knowing I’d like the design, I create jaguar pugmarks. The sample also holds the smaller prints of another Sonoran desert cat – the mountain lion. The exhibits focus – the Sonoran Desert.

In our Arizona desert you can come across a mountain lion, but chances are you will never see a jaguar. But in the Dos Cabezas Mountains (about 60 miles north of the U.S. – Mexico border) you can (if luck and the stars are with you) wander across a jaguar pugmark.

The jaguar has a large pad with toes that fan out. Notice the oval-shaped toes taper, and one comes forward more than the others. The wide based pad is ‘M’ shaped. ( The smaller mountain lion prints appear similar).  The big cat walks with claws retracted so you will not see them in the footprint.

Front pad is larger (left), while hind pad is smaller (right).

Conservationists and researchers use footprints to study large animals in the wild, like the jaguar. Footprint size helps to identify individuals, but it is not an exact science.


i.d.e.a. museum
Sonoran Safari
Opens Friday, February 9  and runs through Sunday, May 27, 2018
Opening Reception: Thursday, February 8, 2018, 5-7 p.m.


gateway into the mind – the beautiful sphenoid bone

The sphenoid bone, from the Greek sphenoeides meaning wedge-shaped, is one of 8 cranial bones – the top portion of the skull that encloses and protects the brain.

One bone leads to another. I draw the ethmoid bone and that study leads into this one. I admire the shape, location, and the symbolic aspects of the sphenoid bone.

The beautiful Sphenoid Bone – Superior View

When I complete the superior view of the cranial bone and post it, people note its resemblance to a moth and a butterfly. You might also imagine a bat with its wings extended. This makes sense when you consider it is a body paired with –  yes – greater and lesser wings and two pterygoid processes that project from below.

This bone sits at the anterior base of the skull, in the very center of the head. It is here where the nerves leave the brain to connect with the spinal column and the lower spine.
Within it you find the sella turcica ( a saddle shape mass) which houses the pituitary gland (that hangs from the base of the brain by a stalk). It helps to form the septum of the nose and the nerves of the eyes pass through it.

Superior View of Sphenoid Bone (in blue) and Ethnoid Bone (in black).

Inferior View of the Sphenoid Bone (blue wash)

… the nerves of the eyes pass through it. As a visual artist I can’t help but take note of this. And it is this detail that might explain why sphenoid bone is known as the gateway into the mind.

Cranial-Sacral therapy recognizes the bone as a keystone of the cranial floor. There is a cranial pulse, a subtle pulsing (and flexing) of this particular bone signifying health – making the wings that much more magical for me. And I can’t help but think of the Caduceus, the medical symbol showing two snakes  winding around a winged staff (life-force rising from the base of the spine). Could the winged crown be the wings of the sphenoid?

The sphenoid considered a sacred bone at the top of the spine, equally as powerful as the sacrum at the bottom.

Inferior aspect of the Sphenoid bone.

Meditate on the beautiful sphenoid bone – breath deep and fly.

the pelvic bowl

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It looks like a bowl, my husband says as my neighbor Tara, a Pelvic Floor Specialist, hands him a pelvis anatomy model. She’s lending it to me for the weekend.

I say to him In fact,  it is called the pelvic bowlEddie. He watches on as Tara pulls it all apart and puts it’s all back together, identifying anatomy as she reconstructs the model.

Aren’t we perfectly designed? I say as I watch them.

My recent drawing begins with an outline of the bones of a pelvis (on the front side).  I place into it uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries. Only then do I decide to bring in the lower spine, the psoas muscles, and eventually the diaphragm.

This weekend I work the back of the drawing ↓ and complete the composition. Highlighting the reproductive system – I’m right back where I started.  The two-sided mixed-media drawing  basically depicts the core of the female body.

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completed back side of drawing 24 x 18″ mixed media

Do you need the model again?, Tara asks. Thanks, I’m complete, I respond.

With this study I learn more about menstruation, conception, pregnancy and menopause. With Tara’s help I learn about hormones, muscles, nerves and the value of breath work.

We are so perfectly designed. You are so perfectly designed. Embody this.

pelvicbowl

More about Tara and her practice (btw – she offers lots of practical information) →  pelvicfloorspecialist.com.


Side note:
Contacted by Carmencita from California who’ll be using an early stage of this drawing (front side) to promote a staging of That Takes Ovaries! Bold Females and their Brazen Acts. The performance will raise funds for Myalgic Encephelomyolitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

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studying the psoas

When I start to draw the reproductive system, I never expect I’ll detail surrounding muscles or organs. Naturally I do, its organic, one thing leads to another.

As of now I’ve added in the iliacus and currently I draw in the diaphragm (maybe a future post). The breath influences it all!

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Psoas major ↑comes from the Greek (psóās) meaning muscle of the loins. Their long, elegant form is one reason I want to draw them. The other, I want more  understanding of muscles and this area is a perfect start.

The psoas (a paired muscle meaning there are 2, one on either side of the spinal column ↓) is the deepest skeletal muscle of your core. It originates in the lower spine, attaching at the 12 thoracic vertebrae to the 5th lumbar vertebrae.

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I can’t help but think of yoga postures that work the area (my favorite flow: Trikonasana to Arda Chandrasa to Chapasana). I also consider practical applications and everyday use.

We activate the muscles in infancy as we learn to both sit up and to walk. The psoas muscles continue to do their job our entire life: holding us up as we stand and moving us forward as we walk. They help us get of bed, they allow us to go up and down stairs, as well as run and bike. And they support us when sitting (as well as standing up).

Side note: too much sitting, in fact, can tighten the muscles (which then places more demand on other muscles causing imbalance). Sleeping on your side, in a fetal position, can destabilize the hips and IT band and shorten the psoas (see what I mean…it’s all connected).

The psoas combined with the iliacus ↓ form the iliopsoas. The iliacus originates inside the pelvic, along the pelvic wall. I add it because the two muscles are paired and I enjoy working curvilinear form.

img_9650The two deep muscles of the midsection combine to form one tendon attaching to the inside of the proximal femur (thigh) bone (hip flexors). Simply stated, they connect torso and legs, affect posture and stabilize the spine.
img_9651Think of the psoas muscles as connecting multiple layers, systems, and expressing subtle yet dynamic energy.  Considering the kidneys sit on the psoas muscles I now wonder, do they resonate with the fight or flight energy of the adrenals?

They do play a vital role in our well-being and stability. Neglecting the muscle can lead to imbalances including anxiety, depression, chronic back pain, knee pain, digestive distress and respiratory problems.

Literally the psoas embodies our deepest urge for survival and our basic desire to thrive (this feels timely). Know they ground one to the earth.

Take a long deep breath – and bring attention into your center

…more on the breath and diaphragm later.

 

the female reproductive system

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I look at the structure of the female reproductive system for a long time. Draw, erase, re-draw, erase again – parts come and go as I place the uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, cervix and vagina into the pelvic bowl. I can’t help but wonder if the body is truly as symmetrical as medical illustration would suggest. Are things evenly balanced? It’s just a thought.

It surprises me to learn the uterus, in general, has not been studied separate from its role in child-bearing. The uterus is seen as someone else’s potential home and valued when it can potentially play that role, says Christine Northrup MD, author of Women’s Bodies, Women’s WisdomAfter the uterus’s childbearing function has been completed or when a woman chooses not to have a child, modern medicine considers the uterus to have no inherent value. The Ovaries are viewed in the same way.

In truth the uterus supports hormonal regulation, sexual satisfaction, and bowel and bladder function. Removal is not advisable unless absolutely necessary. 

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The uterus is held in place by endopelvic fascia or ligaments.

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aligning the pelvis and the muscles

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ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, vaginal canal

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blood supply – arteries

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blood supply – veins

The system is remarkable: life-giving, life-enhancing, curvilinear, expansive, contractive, cyclical, beautifully active.

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added muscle and lymphatic system

Energetically speaking the uterus sits in the area of the Hara (lower belly body center) which holds power, passion and creativity. It is also known as the Dantian or the gate of origin, the Ren Mai, translating to Conception Vessel. It is the space where life begins. Even after a hysterectomy (partial or full) the space holds energy.

Caroline Myss, PhD, in Anatomy of the Spirit, writes about the area and its energetic connection to the power of choice. Choice is born out of opposites, she notes, duality is forever challenging us to make choices in a world of opposing sides. Managing the power of choice, with all its creative and spiritual implications is the essence of human experience. Choice is the process of creation itself.

Every woman can and should ask and answer for themselves – What am I giving birth to? What life am I creating?


I begin the post noting how carefully I look at the female reproductive system. Naturally I consider the energy of current culture. It’s no coincidence that the first week of the new year I choose to focus on the female reproductive system.

Support Planned Parenthood (and other organizations like it). It offers sexual and reproductive health services including health care and sex education, to millions of women, men and young people world-wide.
Other services they provide :

  • anemia testing
  • cholesterol screening
  • diabetes screening
  • physical exams, including for employment and sports
  • flu vaccines
  • help with quitting smoking
  • high blood pressure screening
  • tetanus vaccines
  • thyroid screening

Work to make health care and education accessible and affordable.

no woman is an island

Yesterday I spend the day carefully packing 2 works. Finally, both Tarantula Wasp and Praying Mantis will be making their way to Missouri.

Once upon a time (last Spring to be exact) I had work hanging at ASU.
Krystal connected in March…

My mother is on vacation from Minnesota and texted me some of your images at ASU. I love them. I love bugs and bats and anatomy and maps and you have put them all together in the most beautiful way.

A week later another email from Krystal…

Interestingly enough, my step daughter was also at ASU this week visiting her boyfriend, and she sent pictures of your work to my husband so he could show me. He was in Colorado and came back last night, so we were having coffee this morning and I said “oh, I have to show you these pictures my mom sent you of this artist in Arizona” and I showed him the first picture and he picked up his phone and showed me the same piece of artwork on his phone. So two people we are related to, from different parts of the country, both traveled to ASU in the same week and sent us the same photos, because your artwork made them think of me.

What are the odds of this happening!?

tarantulawasp

Soon another email…

I would like to purchase the Tarantula Wasp and the Praying Mantis. I love them both, I love their predatory nature. I had never heard of a tarantula wasp, but they are amazing. Have you heard of a cicada killer?

No I’ve never heard of a cicada killer. I look it up and learn it is as creepy as the tarantula wasp!

mantis1While the wasp is already scheduled to show to June, in April an opportunity presents itself to show the mantis (to September). Krystal agrees to wait for both.

The next email (cracks me up)…

I hate to wait for the praying mantis, but I have always wanted to have a piece on loan with my name on it. So if you will send me a photo of it with the tag, then I will suck it up and wait.

…and you did Krystal.

Synopsis: No Woman is an Island.
2 bugs, 2 art venues, 2 museum visits, 3 seasons, 3 states, a mother, a step daughter, a boyfriend, a husband and wife and a cup of coffee… #gottahaveart

Thanks again Krystal. And thanks for letting me share our correspondence. It is a good story. Enjoy the insects! They’ll be arriving soon.


The blog posts titled No Woman is an Island acknowledge the people and/or organizations who support me and the work I do.