FIVE15 TO THE POWER OF 5

13528960_10154279595289089_2079661296608733764_n

Hey Phoenix! It’s that time of the year again. The summer months bring 515’s annual guest artist invitational.  Each of the nine members invite 5 artists. In this case you’ll have over 45 artworks to see.

Yes, this is the 5th annual FIVE15 TO THE POWER OF 5. That’s a lot of five’s!

Member Mary Shindell has invited 5 of us. Her guest list includes:

Mark Fry
Christine Cassano
Carolyn Lavender
Nick Shindell
Monica Aissa Martinez

Here are detail shots of each artist’s work –

red%20hummingbird-2

Mary Shindell 
Red Hummingbird 
Laser cut acrylic and paper collage (triptych detail)

markfry_paintingdetail062516

Mark Fry
Looking for Calm Skies 
Encaustic on wood panel

image1

Christine Cassano
Nanoscales  
Mixed media (detail)

Otter-%20Otter%20in%20progress%2020160624_0006

Carolyn Lavender
Otter-Otter
Graphite on paper (detail)

image2

Nick Shindell
Patti 
Acrylic and oil on canvas panel (detail)

IMG_9043

Monica Aissa Martinez
 The Little Brain 

Mixed media on mylar (detail)

WHO: Five 15
WHAT: FIFTH ANNUAL FIVE15 TO THE FIFTH (FIVE15 TO THE POWER OF 5) GUEST ARTIST INVITATIONAL
WHEN: July and August
First Friday, July 1st and August 5th (6-10PM)
Reception on Third Friday, July 15th and August 19th (6-10PM)
WHERE: 515 E Roosevelt St, Phoenix, AZ
Every artwork will be available for purchase. Buy it, take it!

See you there!

phoenix first friday – comings and goings

Someone suggests I film visitors walking through my container. I don’t do it, but I do take photos of groups moving through Cella on First Friday night. I have to say again, I particularly enjoy watching people move through the space. I have a habit of seeing everything as a learning experience and this does become (for me) a social study of sorts.

We are certainly conditioned to move through space. Someone reminds me of a high-school hallway where one keeps to the right. Yes we do, I remember. Even in the chaos of the crowded and busy evening, the majority of people line up, enter on the right side and exit to the left. But there are always those that don’t – follow the path. And even though this is my space, and I want order, I secretly cheer those people on. Rebels too, have a place in society.

There is much about this experience I take with me. Like that I find it difficult to see people come so very close to my work.  I recall every museum I have ever visited and a security guard who asks me to step back. The work invites people to look closely. And people are for the most part, respectful. I have to and do locate a comfortable balance within myself.

I listen to conversations – thoughtful and amusing. You know – people respond to the body (parts) in interesting ways. They do respond.

cellaatnight

I grew up in El Paso, a Texas border town, so I’ve always been interested in physical and symbolic transition  and change of space. The phICA (Phoenix Institute of Contemporary Art) containers are situated in downtown Phoenix which now is in full reconstruction – noisy and chaotic. For me, creating (a) Cella became the creating of a fine and private place. Of course the agreement is to invite in the public, after setting up, I really didn’t want to – invite anyone in. I like things my way and I enjoy solitude. It works itself out. I learn more about environments and thresholds and change of space and how those things affect ones mental focus and energy. I learn about order and chaos, my space, your space and our  public space – letting things go and bringing them all back in…over and over again.

People. Change.

IMG_8740

install / cella

install

Invited to show my work with Phoenix Institute of Contemporary Art, it’s the alternative art space that pulls at my attention. I want the challenge.  I spend yesterday installing drawings in the repurposed shipping container.  The long, narrow area has forced me to think and work differently. I realize quickly my original plan is not going to work.

A few curious passerby’s wander in. One woman, from Canada, tells me she’s read about Roosevelt Row and when planning her visit to Phoenix, puts it on her list of places to see.  I ask if they can walk though the space so I can see how they move in it. They are more than excited to comply. They do what I am hoping they will do, plan B works. Are you in Science, she asks. That’s the perfect question. I also meet a group of college students from Boston. They come close to ask questions and take photos.

I title the show Cella and after being in there all day, the name is right. It most definitely is like a small chamber, it is  in fact a rectangular room, simple and windowless, with an open entrance set to the front. Lets see how it will do with a crowd of visitors…I can only guess.

I walk away thinking the room appears like a sterile environment, suitable for anatomy study.

IMG_8679

Handout and artist statement:

Layout 1

Exhibition runs:
March 18, 2016, Third Friday, 6 – 10
April 1, 2016, First Friday, 6 – 10
Art Detour, March 19 and 20, Saturday and Sunday
Roosevelt Row in Downtown Phoenix (between eye lounge and Modified in downtown Phoenix)

feminism today in shade gallery @ the monorchid

This weekend is Art Detour.

10860971_10202442728429922_7391776261577526922_op

Nicole Royse organized an exhibition titled Feminism Today. It holds to be a powerful exhibit of 13 women artists. And You’re invited!
The exhibition will be displayed in Shade Gallery at the monOrchid. Focusing on the loose theme “Feminism Today,” looking at the many roles woman play including artist, mother, wife, friend , etc. How do these topics affect, play a role, or reflect within artists work?


Artists:
Kristin Bauer
Christine Cassano
Cherie Buck Hutchinson
Mimi Jardine
Melissa Martinez
Monica Aissa Martinez
Lara Plecas
Mary Shindell
Constance McBride
Irma Sanchez
Beth Ames Swartz
Marilyn Szabo
Denise Yaghmourian

image12

My work in the background and Christine Cassano’s work in the foreground @ MonOrchid (Photo by Nicole Royse)

 

Feminism Today
Shade Gallery at the monOrchid from March 6th until March 29th, 2015.
Opens: First Friday, March 6th, 6-10pm
Closing: Third Friday, March 20th, 6-10pm.

Art Detour 27: Saturday, March 7th and Sunday, March 8th from 11am-4pm
more info → visit website

celebrating insects @ the i.d.e.a. museum

colour

The i.d.e.a. Museum presents Jeepers Creepers: BUGS In Art
A Celebration of Insects (for children and adults)

The gallery will be filled with fun, artistic bugs that are inspirational and informative for all ages. Put on a bee suit and do a waggle dance or step into a make-believe world with giant bugs! You can even compare your size to extinct Paleo bugs and experience over 40 artworks made of all types of materials including video, watercolor, mixed-media and fabric by 10 different artists.

Here are a few samples of some of the artwork:

jeeperscreepers-1

Barrett Klein, Damselflies, , Digital

 

604_Unearthed_composite

Barrett Klein, UnEarth, modified globe, soil, salt and paint

 

Uravitch_Andrea_2CicadaShell

Andrea Uravitch, Cicada Shell, Mixed media


Uravitch_Andrea_3OrangeCicada (2)

Andrea Uravitch, Orange Cicada, Mixed media

JEWEL BEETLE OPEN LID 2

Jeanie Pratt, Jewel Beetle Teapot, Sterling silver, fine silver, 18K gold, jewel (Buprestid) beetle wings, ammonite, peridot, Mexican opal, dichroic glass beads, stainless steel

Jewel Beetle Teapot

Jeanie Pratt, Jewel Beetle Teapot, Sterling silver, fine silver, 18K gold, jewel (Buprestid) beetle wings, ammonite, peridot, Mexican opal, dichroic glass beads, stainless steel

purple hairstreak copy

Georgette Rosberg, Purple Hairstreak, (butterfly) Color photos

 

blue dasher

Georgette Rosberg, Blue Dasher (dragonfly), Color photo

photo 1

Joan Danziger, Honey Beetle, Metal, glass, acrylic paint‏

photo 2

Joan Danziger, Patchwork Beetle, Metal, fused glass, frit,dichroic glass

img_5965b

Monica Aissa Martinez, House fly, Mixed media collage on panel

img_5999

Monica Aissa Martinez, Hawkmoth, Mixed media collage on panel

Edgar Cardenas includes video work that focuses on understanding the backyard as an ecological space just like any other environment. ↓

There will be plenty of opportunities to test your knowledge and learn all about bugs through fun and challenging puzzles, games and art-making activities or you can take the challenge to debunk myths about bugs and insects while learning facts like:

  • How insects help us and are beneficial to the environment
  • The different parts of insects
  • What insects eat
  • Insect homes
  • Life cycles of insects
  • How insects communicate
  • Insects that are edible
  • Insects that are extinct and newly discovered species

Featured artists:

Edgar Cardenas, Phoenix AZ
Eric Carle, Key Largo FL Courtesy of the Eric Carle Museum
Desi Constance, Phoenix AZ
Denise A. Currier, Mesa AZ
Joan Danziger, Washington DC
Wesley Fleming, Ashfield, MA, Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge
Joel Floyd, University Park MD
Elaine Hultgren, Phoenix AZ
Tara Jaggi, Pleasantville PA
Barrett Klein, La Crosse WI
Mindy Lighthipe, The Villages FL
Monica Aissa Martinez, Phoenix AZ
Karen Paust, Wellsville PA, Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge
Jeanie Pratt, Nipomo CA, Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge
Andrea V. Uravitch, Washington DC, Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge
Georgette Rosberg, Tucson AZ
Emelee Van Zile, courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge

Specimens and fossils:
High-resolution images, exhibition activities and content & specimens from Frank Hasbrouck Insect Collection, Education and Outreach department at Arizona State University
Arizona Museum of Natural History, collaborating to loan insect collections, insect fossils and bugs preserved in amber

WHO: i.d.e.a. Museum
WHAT: Jeepers Creepers : Bugs in Art
WHERE: in the Whiteman Family Exhibition Gallery
WHEN: Oct 9 to Jan 25

 

For more info about exhibition, events, admission fee, hours of operation → The Idea Museum

* One photo from each artist posted here will direct you to their web site.
Do take the time to visit all the artists listed and their websites – the work is varied and wonderful!

sex: a woman’s perspective

This summer I received an invitation from Beatrice Moore:

I am organizing an exhibit of all woman artists for September at Frontal Lobe Community Space and Gallery, in the Bragg’s Pie Factory building and I wanted to invite you to participate.

“Sex: A Woman’s Perspective” is intended to be interpreted in any way the artist likes. I’ve intentionally left off any descriptors so as not to influence the interpretation someone decides to make. This exhibit is one of several that will emphasize the work of Valley women artists. 

I didn’t wait too long to reply, especially after going through the list of invited artists – most of whom have been actively working in various mediums in the Phoenix and Valley art scene for many years.

Beatrice notes: the exhibit is comprised of women artists who I feel can interestingly, and provocatively, engage the public in a spoken, visual, and tactile dialogue about the many meanings and various interpretations of ‘sex’.

Artists include: Babs A’Delic, Melinda Bergman, Sue Chenoweth, Susan Copeland, Mona Higuchi, Dena Johnson, Carolyn Lavender, Annie Lopez, Carrie Marill, Monica Aissa Martinez, Lara Plecas, Christy Puetz, Irma Sanchez, Heather Smith-Gearns, Karolina Sussland, Jen Urso, Yuko Yabuki, and Denise Yaghmourian; with a special body painting project by Gingher Leyendecker.

Below are a few examples of works – you only see a part of the art or ‘in progress’ shot. You’ll want to  go see the show in person – for the complete experience.
(Some photos offer artist website link.)

detail 1

Carrie Marill
Quiet Conditions  – detail
gouache on paper
14″x40″ 
2009

flesh image4ad

Irma Sanchez
Flesh – detail      
2′ x 2′ 
#4 of Sugar Panel Series.
Royal Cream Icing, (artists own recipe) applied to untreated wood, gel food color additive, gouche and silver aerosol.
2013
– Experimental

SAM_0311

Christy Puetz
Karla – detail
glass beads, cloth, mixed media
2013

SexProject4

Karolina Sussland
Digital Print – in process
2013

Lopez Area of Concern

Annie Lopez
Area of Concern – detail
dress made of cyanotype prints on tamale wrapper paper
2013

oracle

Yuko Yabuki
Oracle – in progress
acrylic on wood
18″x24″
2013

suec

Sue Chenoweth
The Ghosts of Christmas Past – detail
acrylic, wood and mylar on panel
24 x 18″
2013

photo

Denise Yaghmourian
I Love My Bicycle Face – detail
Performance
2013

photo

Denise Yaghmourian
Succulent – detail
Mixed Media
2013

oracle

Yuko Yabuki
Oracle – in progress
acrylic on wood
18″x24″
2013

intimacy

Monica Aissa Martinez
I don’t think it needs a title – detail
Casein on Canvas
18″ x 35″
2013

WHO: Frontal Lobe Community Space and Gallery
WHAT: Sex: A Woman’s Perspective – Curated by Beatrice Moore
WHERE: Frontal Lobe Community Space and Gallery
in Bragg’s Pie Factory,
1301 Grand, Phoenix, AZ
WHEN: September 6 at 6:00pm until September 21 at 4:00pm
Opening Reception: 6-10pm, September 6, 2013
Closing Reception: 6-10pm, September 20, 2013
Special → Artlink Collectors Tour, September 21, 1-4

The exhibit will also be open Saturday September 21st from 1-4pm.
and by appt. : contact Beatrice Moore at 602.391.4016 or email her for more info.

Click here to → rsvp on Facebook

about the space:
The Frontal Lobe Community Space and Gallery is a relatively new space on Grand Avenue in the historic Bragg’s Pie Factory building. The goal of the space is to showcase both established and lesser known artists, and create a place where fine art and community endeavors co-exist, and at times, overlap. The space is intended to be utilized as a community space as much as a gallery, and provides a venue where non-commercial work is encouraged and embraced. Film, performance, music, exhibits, historical explorations, science, and a host of other topics and various mediums are encouraged as part of an eclectic mix and a variety of approaches.

raw @ the tempe library

Christy Brown organizes the Tempe Community Galleries exhibitions. She explains that in conjunction with the Tempe Center for the Arts Gallery’s Smithsonian “Green Revolution” exhibition (which opened last January), all the community gallery shows will have “going green” themes this year.


Raw opens today. The exhibition focuses on the work of three artists  who are choosing to move away from the use of harsh chemicals and synthetic materials in their work, and are instead working with raw, recycled or organic materials. I am one of those artists, as are Joe Willie Smith and Aimee León.

Artists
Aimee León
An artist and certified sheep shearer, uses natural raw wool along with recycled industrial materials. The show includes a number of her small and soft – object forms . Most are beautiful tactile vessels. I want to touch them all.

8646287_orig

Joe Willie Smith
A multi-media artist and musician includes works in metal.  He works with found objects and repurposed material. He talks in general about finding just the right piece and then in particular about the white form below – how he scratched/drew on it one early morning to catch both the light and shadow of the sunrise.

IMG_4583

I have several posts about Joe Willie’s work and our collaborative effort at sound making – which I’ve used as background for all the Nothing In Stasis videos.

Raw includes a number of my paintings and one small drawing. I work with organic material, primarily egg tempera and casein.  I like to refer to my mediums as egg and milk. This work below uses casein as underpainting, and egg tempera as the surface color.

vitalcommotion4

Vital Commotion #4

Delivery and Install
I plan to drop off work and head back to the studio to paint, but when I learn Joe Willie is in the exhibit and he’ll be dropping work off, I wait for him. And as it all plays out we spend the morning working with installer, James Sulac.  Before Christy leaves for the morning she mentions how the work might hang. She asks which side of the wall I want my work on and I tell her. But after Joe Willie arrives and we begin seeing how interestingly things connect, we suggest the work hang in the space mixing together. Below are a few install shots.

IMG_4568

IMG_4569
IMG_4589

I understand we connect in terms of the raw materials theme, but as I look at everything I appreciate Christy’s eye more and more. The organic forms of León’s soft sculpture connects to the light forms and color in my paintings and to [the appearance] of softness in 2 of Willie’s larger pieces.

And you probably can’t tell from these photos (below) but the colors and lines in Joe’s work connect to my use of the same design elements. The acid green of his sculpture (below) runs right through the mid-section of my painting to the left, and is high-lighted by reddish pink points in both works. Joe Willie decides grouping his smaller pieces salon style will enhance the grouping of shapes in my compositions, and vice versa.

IMG_4572

IMG_4580

I regret not getting shots of another wall where León’s wall pieces hang along side Joe’s and my work, a similar soft glow of lavender and blue shows up. Somehow all the work organizes between fragility and strength.

It’s Raw and you’ll just have to go see for yourself.

vital commotion #6

WHAT: Raw
WHERE: Tempe Public Library
(Lower Level Youth Library)
WHEN: Now to Dec 4th

The Tempe Public Library is located at
3500 S Rural Rd
Tempe, AZ 85282.

As you arrive watch for the Museum marker below, on the corner of Southern and Rural.
musuemsign

For more info on show and for artists’ statements click on  → Raw